Dehydrated Fruit

- Dec 27, 2018 -

Yes, dried fruits -- including dried apricots, dried cranberries, raisins, dried dates, dried figs and prunes -- pack a big nutrient punch for their shrunken size.


The reason is that nutrients and fiber are more concentrated when water is removed from fruit. For comparison, a half-cup of dried apricot halves has 4.7 grams of fiber, but the same amount of fresh apricot slices has 1.6 grams of fiber. Dried fruit is also a rich source of antioxidants and the B vitamin folate.


However, it's important to keep in mind that the natural sugars in dried fruit are also more concentrated, which isn't necessarily cause for concern for the general population and may even be helpful for athletes needing quick fuel. But it can be an issue for those carefully watching their sugars, carbs or calories. For example, a cup of grapes has 23 grams of sugar and 104 calories, but a cup of raisins has 116 grams of sugar! And it has 520 calories -- five times the amount!


Also, limit dried fruits that contain added sugars (cranberries are a frequent culprit, according to Zanini) or are coated in sugar, such as dried pineapple rings or other candied fruit. Finally, if you are sensitive to sulfites or have asthma, choose organic brands of dried fruit that do not contain sulfur dioxide, a preservative.

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